Signed Copies of Forward Available Now

I’ve had quite a few requests for signed copies of Forward, and I’m happy to give in to your demands!

paperback edition of Forward (Book 5: The Eventing Series)

Order a signed copy of any one of my books in paperback!

You can always email me a request for a signed paperback, and I’ll just process your order through PayPal. Since I don’t keep paperbacks at home (unlike authors who possess a garage to put boxes in, I live in a fairly small two-bedroom apartment and I am out of space for more books without adding in my own inventory!) I just have to add a few dollars to the retail price to cover shipping. If you want a copy of Forward by media mail, it will be $19.95 ($16.95 retail + $3 shipping).

If you’d like to order Forward or any other books, please send me an email (natalie at nataliekreinert.com with “Signed Book Order” in the subject line) and include any pertinent details – who it’s being signed to, where it’s being shipped, anything else you think I should know. I’ll send you an invoice via PayPal and we’ll get you your book!

The following titles are available in paperback:

  • Ambition
  • Pride
  • Courage
  • Luck
  • Forward
  • Show Barn Blues
  • Horses in Wonderland
  • The Head and Not The Heart
  • Other People’s Horses
  • Turning for Home

See them all with retail pricing here: Natalie Keller Reinert paperbacks at Amazon

You can also find my paperbacks in person when you attend events and trade fairs with a booth by Taborton Equine Books! You never know, some of them might be signed from the last time I had an appearance at their booth!

Thanks for your interest in signed copies! It’s always a pleasure to know I’m adding to someone’s book collection.

Forward, Book 5 of The Eventing Series, is now available!

Today is the release day for Forward, Book 5 of The Eventing Series. It feels so right to be bringing this book to you right after the wonderful Kentucky Three-Day Event weekend. To spend the whole weekend immersed in the very best of our sport, and then to share a story about striving to reach the top of Eventing, is the pinnacle of writing equestrian fiction (for me, anyway!).

Forward continues where Luck left off — like the other books in this series, I’ve enjoyed writing them as a serial, without gaps in the action between novels. It’s now late spring in north-central Florida, and the sun is hot, the arenas are dry, and the show season is winding down… or is it? There’s a lot to prep for and everything to play for this summer!The Eventing Series

Forward is available on Kindle, Kindle Unlimited, and paperback here. If your library has a request program, you can also request they add it to their collection!

If you’re new to the series or looking for new equestrian fiction in your life, start with Ambition, Book 1 of The Eventing Series. This month I’ve also created an updated, revised edition of Ambition. You can find it on Kindle, Kindle Unlimited, paperback, audiobook and Audible here.

All of my equestrian fiction novels can be accessed at my Amazon page, here.

Before you start reading, I have a request. Please share the word about Forward and your other favorite equestrian fiction books! It is truly amazing (and it can be a little disheartening) to find out how many people don’t know there are new, authentic equestrian stories available to read. Publishers and industry magazines keep putting out lists of “great horse stories” which are just rehashes of The Saddle Club, Thoroughbred, and Black Beauty lists we’ve all been seeing since we were kids. But we all know equestrian fiction has changed with the times!

Please add Forward on Goodreads and leave a review or rating, review Forward on Amazon, and share the news with your friends! I’d love it if you share this Facebook post with your friends and equestrian groups, too.

Adding, reviewing, and sharing are three easy steps that help all of your favorite authors continue to reach new readers — and that’s what gives us the encouragement and the financial ability to write more books for you!

Thanks for everything, and happy reading! I’m going to get busy on a new novel now!

First Read: Sneak Peek of Forward – Book 5 of The Eventing Series

The latest installment in the bestselling Eventing Series releases at the end of April — are you ready to find out what happens next with Jules and Pete? When we last saw them, Jules was settling into life as the coach and manager of Alachua Eventing Co-op, and Pete had finally gotten that troublesome gray jumper, Rogue, into his program.

Of course, Jules never planned on being a riding coach — if you’ll recall, she’s always been very adamant about not teaching for a living. This feels like it will be a tough adjustment for her. And where does her new arrangement leave Pete? He’s been having a difficult time adjusting to life outside Briar Hill and the comforts of his own farm. He’s let Jules steer the ship for the past year, and now she seems to have found a safe harbor for them — if he can find his place there.

It’s going to be quite a year at Alachua Eventing Co-op, with the students getting ready for their first events, plus a full slate of competition for Mickey, Dynamo, and the other horses. Jules will need some help from old friends — and maybe some old enemies, too — but she is going to keep moving forward, no matter what. From the pine plantations of north Florida to the skyscraper shadows of the Central Park Horse Show, Forward is all about chasing dreams, wherever they may lead.

Here’s a sneak peek of what’s coming in Forward: Book 5 of The Eventing Series.

Forward: Book 5 of The Eventing Series first read graphic

Read now! Chapter 1 – Part 1 of Forward

The day I fought with Pete, the light streaming through the skyscrapers was a brilliant gold, gilding every leaf and every blade of grass and every stray pebble knocked by careless feet into the pathways of the park. No one turned and looked at us, because we were civilized people and it was too awful, too embarrassing: the young woman with the tear-streaked face and sun-touched hair falling from a once-sleek bun; the young man with the piercing eyes leaning on the well-worn crutches. No one turned and looked at us, but they all heard us, and we didn’t care, we didn’t stop, until we both wanted to and it was too late and we had turned away from each other.

The day I fought with Pete, New York was a film set, the kind of New York everyone sees in the movies and never finds in real life. Just moments before, the day had been gray, rain-spattered, diesel-scented, like a tractor left running in the barn aisle on a soggy December morning. As riders from cleaner climates, we’d looked at each other from our vantage points atop our horses and asked: why would anyone live here?

Then, suddenly, without warning, the clouds parted and the sun sprang up from the rooftops of Manhattan and the people came pouring out of their apartment doors like bees swarming from their hive. And just like bees, they buzzed straight to the park, to bury their noses in the sweet clover of the lawns, and when they saw us already there, in our breeches and our boots, leading our gleaming horses to the arena set up at the Wollman Rink, even the most jaded New Yorkers paused to give us a second glance. We were alien and lovely, and we towered above them even on the ground, even when we were fighting.

The day I fought with Pete, the mayor shook our hands and told us we were favorites of his niece, and did we see her showing at the Winter Equestrian Festival in West Palm back in January? We did not; we were not WEF people and we knew his niece had never heard of either of us, but we smiled back and said we’d look for her this coming winter, and he smiled and said she’d love that—she’d be the girl on the white pony, with pigtails. The governor was there, too but we didn’t meet him; he didn’t like horses and he kept to himself, sitting aloof on the platform where the dignitaries were enthroned, pretending they knew what was going on in the arena before them.

The day I fought with Pete was the best day of my life, for at least ten hours or so.

Want more? Yes, I’m being a tease! There’s more to chapter one — unlock it when you sign up for my author updates. You’ll get an occasional email when I have a new release or an upcoming event… it’s much better than relying on Facebook for updates!

Click here to sign up and I’ll send you the password to access my Email Subscriber-only section of the website!

You can pre-order the ebook of Forward: Book 5 of The Eventing Series at Amazon. For paperback copies, stay tuned!

Announcing Forward, Book 5 of The Eventing Series

I have great news to begin April 2019! The newest installment in The Eventing Series, Forward, is publishing on April 30 — and you can pre-order your copy now.

Forward: Book 5 of The Eventing Series

Forward: Book 5 of The Eventing Series

Here’s the story: at the end of Luck, we saw Jules and Pete settling into a new life at Alachua Eventing Co-op, where Jules will be the manager and head riding instructor. It’s not exactly what she expected out of her career, but things are going fine, and it’s better than living in a horse trailer, right?

The cracks begin to show as the eventing season winds up and summer sets in across Florida. Pete’s new horse has an overbearing owner who is pressuring him into pushing the horse too fast. Dynamo suddenly seems to be showing his age on the cross-country course. And how on earth is Jules supposed to manage a barn, a dozen kids, and her own competition schedule?

She’ll need some help from old friends — and maybe some old enemies, too — but Jules is going to keep moving forward, no matter what. From the pine plantations of north Florida to the skyscraper shadows of the Central Park Horse Show, Forward is all about chasing dreams, wherever they may lead.

I am extremely excited about this book, which brings together a cast of characters I had a lot of fun developing, and tells a story I think is a natural next step for Jules and Pete. I really think you’re going to like it.

How to get your copy

Kindle: Forward is available for pre-order for Kindle — order your copy and have it automatically download on April 30, 2019. Click here.

Kindle Unlimited: Read Forward for free with your Kindle Unlimited membership beginning April 30, 2019. Bookmark this page.

Paperback: You’ll be able to order a paperback from Amazon on or about April 30, 2019. Bookmark this page.

Patreon: Subscribe to my Patreon at $5 per month and you’ll receive access to the complete first draft of Forward right now, plus a download of the finished book on April 30, 2019. Subscribe at $15 per month and after the second month you’ll receive a signed paperback from me! Learn more about Patreon’s exclusive benefits here.

Audio: Audio is not yet available. Please stay tuned!

First Read: Horses in Wonderland

Horses in Wonderland Kindle CoverThe sequel to Show Barn Blues is now on pre-sale at Amazon! Thanks to so many readers for making it a number one horse book in several categories! Lots of early readers at Patreon have been loving the updates to the story of Grace, Kennedy, Anna and the other riders, grooms and boarders at Seabreeze Equestrian Center. If you’re not a Patreon member, no worries! Here’s the first chapter of Horses in Wonderland, just to give you a taste of what’s coming.

Just for reference, this book takes place about two years after Show Barn Blues. If you read The Eventing Series, you’ll know that the summer after Show Barn Blues takes place in Pride, Book 2 of The Eventing Series. This action, while it doesn’t overlap with The Eventing Series, picks up the summer after Luck, Book 4 of The Eventing Series.

Grace has been dealing with the increasing construction around her farm for years now, and she’s the last hold-out in what used to be an equestrian neighborhood. A luxury resort is going in right next door, and the construction noise is taking its toll on daily life at the equestrian center. What should she do? Grace thinks it might be time to move on.

Take a look…

Horses in Wonderland

Chapter 1

Summer was in the air, and in Florida, that feeling was more like a warning than a promise.

The morning’s heavy humidity had settled onto my skin like a cloak the moment I left my little bungalow. The wooden porch steps, gently rotting into slivers and chips after living through eighty seasons of dry winters and wet summers, squeaked a good morning beneath my boots. All of the wood—the floorboards, the porch, the stairs—had more give on humid mornings. More pliable, more squeaky. I could tell the new season had arrived from the moment I put my feet on the floor this morning. The longer you lived somewhere, the more you became aware of the barometers all around you. Nature forecast the weather every day, in chirps and frog-song, in locust chorals and soft westerly winds, in spiraling leaves and creaking wood. I paused at the foot of the steps and stretched, dew-drops clinging to the hairs on my arms. A spiderweb glittering from the little crooked light by the front door. A dark early-May morning at the end of a short spring. Perhaps my last spring here, in the house my grandfather built. I paused at the bottom step, swept my gaze around, and soaked in my surroundings.

The pre-dawn sky had just lightened to cobalt, a blue growing richer with every passing second. A swirl of fog wound its way through a small glade of live oaks. Just beyond it, the blue-white light over the barn’s side-entrance hummed away, swooping moths orbiting its moon-glow. I pointed the toes of my well-worn paddock boots towards the barn, brushed a few unruly strands of gray and brown forelock from my eyes, and started off to work. My footsteps were softened by the wet leaves piled up on the sparse grass and sandy patches beneath the trees, but the horses would still hear me. I imagined them turning their heads all at once, ears pricked, gazing into the darkness, ready to turn on their whinnies and neighs at precisely the right moment.

My gaze shifted to the right, towards the construction site next door. There was a model villa going up over there, with just a thin belt of pine trees left to shield the future residents from the smelly, noisy reality of equestrian life. Just wait until the first morning someone left their windows open all night and heard my barn’s wake-up song, belted out in three dozen or more untrained voices, each more shrill and lusty than the last.

A tree frog peeped in the gutter above the open barn door as my feet hit the pavement, but he was quickly drowned out by those thirty-some roaring horses. From across the driveway, the night turn-out horses neighed and pushed at their paddock gates, adding the rattling of chains to the morning music recital.

“How quickly you forget,” I announced to the barn at large, flipping on the lights. “Twelve hours ago you were a herd of cows in clover.”

The barn’s overhead lamps were huge, the kind you saw in school gyms, and they’d take a good fifteen minutes to warm up to full capacity. For now, the broad barn aisle ahead of me was washed in a cool dim glow. The horses blinked at the sudden shift from nighttime to twilight, and then went straight back to whinnying. A few kicks were added here and there, fore-hooves shoved against stall doors, hind hooves slammed against side walls to prove some point to the neighboring horse.

“Your percussion section is out of rhythm,” I observed.

No one listened to me. They never did.

“Good morning,” I continued the greetings to my left and my right as I proceeded down the wide concrete aisle, horses on either side of me stamping and shouting for my immediate attention. I alternated between pleasantries and protestations. “Good god. Yes, I get it. Hello, Ivor. Yes, you’re hungry. Good morning, Splash! Oh, please, all of you shut up, it’s too early for this.”

No one listened. Two long aisles of horses sang the song of their people. It was me against the herd, and I’d given up trying to shout them down years ago. Everything I said these days was for my own benefit.

At the end of the aisle, just past the school tack room where the heaps of battered riding lesson tack and brush boxes perched on top of weathered old tack trunks, I turned left and unlocked the feed room door. It was odd, and a little pleasant, to be here alone. Usually there would be grooms here throwing down hay and getting everyone’s bellies settled with some roughage before their grain, but this morning I’d started early, so it would be just me out here for a while. I didn’t feel like listening to the barn complaints for the next twenty minutes while I went out to the hay-shed and loaded up the Gator with bales of timothy, so they could eat their grain first for once. The magazines promised dire consequences for horses who were fed grain on empty stomachs, but I was already several decades deep into housekeeping before those veterinary studies had come out, and I felt comfortable breaking their rules from time to time.

I had to rummage through two trash cans full of pellets and sweet feed before I found the feed scoop in its shallow grave, buried under the alfalfa pellets. One of my employees, Kennedy, had been in charge of refilling the feed bins last night, and she could be a little scatterbrained. I dug it out with a sigh, glad she wasn’t around right now. I wasn’t up to Kennedy’s bright-eyed enthusiasm at this time of morning.

Six o’clock was early for me, but I would be short on help today and figured I’d better get a head-start, because the afternoon tumult of riding lessons and trail rides was not going to take a vacation just because my groom head-count was down by three. Not so many months ago, there had been enough grooms for the endless work of keeping a massive show barn ticking over smoothly, but the threat of moving properties was hovering over our heads, and grooms were not known to stay aboard sinking ships. As they went on to greener pastures, one by one, I waved bon voyage to the tail-lights of their pick-up trucks, then trudged back into the barn to take on a few more of their abandoned responsibilities. There was no point in trying to hire people when I couldn’t promise whether their job would be here or an hour away in six months.

Beneath the sterile gleam of fluorescent lights, I pulled out the morning supplement packs, individually packaged for each horse, and stacked them in order on top of the grain cart. I dumped what was left of the pellets in the trash can into the grain cart’s well and topped it off with most of another fifty-pound bag. I grabbed a couple of old Strongid buckets’ worth of alfalfa pellets and sweet feed from the other trash cans. Then I threw the feed scoop on top of the whole pile, dragged the heavy cart into the aisle, and stopped immediately at the first stall on my left.

A bay Hanoverian mare named Catarina eyeballed me, and then the grain cart, with barely contained excitement. She whinnied explosively and kicked her door. “Stop it,” I snapped, the words blended into one fierce command, and reached down for the first supplement pack.

Moses, the name on the pack read.

At this moment, I realized I’d stacked the supplement packs backwards. I redid them. There were thirty-seven in all. The horses were not amused with this delay. Catarina, with her front-row seat to the proceedings, nearly had a fit. “Here,” I sighed, throwing a scoop of grain through the little feed door above her bucket, and dumping the supplements on top of it. She dug in with her mouth wide open, like a lion going for the kill, before I had even pulled back my hand. I whacked her with the plastic supplement pack for being so rude, but she ignored me. Food was more important than a puny slap from a puny human.

By six forty-five every horse was finished with grain and nosing through fresh hay, and I was exhausted. Well, not exhausted from the work I’d done, precisely, but at the thought of so much more to come, with the same routine yet to come tomorrow, and the next day, and the next, forever and ever. I’d been the manager for so long, and I’d done precisely that: I’d managed. You, go handle feed. Carole, go handle hay. Mike, start filling water buckets. Liz, pull off blankets. Me, I’ll be in the office, going over the day’s schedule. Carole, Mike and Liz were all part of the past now. Tom had been gone even longer, off to work with his first love, marine mammal rescue. I had Margaret, Kennedy and Anna full-time still, and part-time help from some Ocala castaways. Ricky and Nadine were young but battered, in that way a poor Southern upbringing can mark a person. Ricky drove a rock truck most days, hauling dirt to the construction site next door. Nadine worked part-time at a Hair Cuttery. Both of them spent Saturday through Monday here, mucking stalls and being generally useful while they gave the full-time grooms a much-needed day off.

I looked up over the central rank of stalls to the windows overlooking the barn floor. My dark office window looked blankly down, useless without me peering out of it, watching the barn live its own measured life.

My phone rang from somewhere down the aisle and I ran for it.

“Kennedy?” I answered, breathless from my sprint to the feed room where I’d abandoned my phone on a shelf next to a tub of bute. “Please tell me you’re coming today. We have six horses going out at two and—“

“Of course I’m coming,” Kennedy laughed. She was always so awake. Kennedy was twenty-six and had a naturally chipper attitude which had made her perfect for the role of princess at a long-running dinner show on the other side of the theme park district. This also made her perfect for teaching little girls to ride and for leading trail rides. She put on a very convincing cowboy-themed ride, which was especially impressive when you considered we were operating in a rapidly developing section of Florida and the trails were based out of an English show barn, about as far from the Wild West as one could go. “I just wanted to know if you needed help early this morning. I’m up, so…”

I looked outside, across the empty parking lot towards the pine woods at the farm’s eastern border. The sky was just turning pink above the stark longleaf pines and the spike-edged palmettos, and a hint of morning light was creeping into the barn, brushing the stalls closest to the end, inching across the feed room floor towards my boots. At my far right, the hay shed stood dark and forbidding, stacked high with bales. I still had to throw down bales and get everyone fed up. The night horses had to be brought in, and the day horses turned out. The night horses were watching me steadily over the dark fencing, occasionally belting out a fresh chorus of whinnies in case I’d forgotten them. Behind the paddocks, along the farm’s southern fence-line, a red-tiled villa was catching the first glints of orange sunlight, a morning glow highlighting its fanciful arches and mosaic tile-work around the windows. The model home for the new resort village going in next door, somehow closer to my barn than my own house was. The sight of it was enough to make me droop.

“I need help,” I said honestly, and I remembered that not long ago, I couldn’t have admitted that, not to Kennedy, not to anyone. As more years went by, the more thankful I was for people like her. People who got up at six-thirty for no apparent reason and thought, I should go into work early today.

“I’ll be right over,” Kennedy promised. “With breakfast. Hey, when is Anna coming back?”

“This afternoon, I hope,” I said. “I haven’t seen her car here yet.”

“I hope so. I miss her so much.”

Something about Kennedy’s tone made me pause. She was given to extravagant emotions, so I would always expect her to react just a little over-the-top when someone close to her did something basic and expected, like go home and visit her parents for a week as Anna had done. I missed Anna, naturally; my sweet and unruffled barn manager had been part of my barn family for years, and she was certainly the calm glue that held us together when ridiculous situations—hurricanes, wildfires, a skunk in the feed room—threatened our sanity.

But Kennedy sounded as if she was absolutely pining for Anna to come home.

“Look for her when you’re back from your trail ride,” I suggested. “I better get back to work now. There’s a lot on this morning and just me right now.”

“Okay, I’m leaving now. And I’m bringing breakfast,” the optimist said. “Just relax.”

I slipped the phone into the back pocket of my jeans. Just relax. Just relax. Kennedy was out of her mind if she thought I had the luxury to relax for one damn minute. I hadn’t spent all these decades running a show barn for my health and mental wellbeing.

I hustled out of the feed room and up the barn aisle, ready to start swapping turn-out horses with stalled ones before the construction clamor started up next door. I’d gotten through two paddocks and had two horses in hand, just leading them through the gate of their paddock, when the first rock trucks started roaring by on the other side of the back fence. The horse on my right spooked forward, the horse on my left spooked backward. I was splayed out like a scarecrow, hauling on both lead-ropes in an effort to reel them back in.

“That noise is hardly new,” I scolded, tapping a wide-eyed warmblood on the nose once I had him heading in the right direction again. “Why don’t you get a grip?” With that, I released them both into the paddock so they could bolt around like idiots, snorting and snapping their tails, as if they hadn’t been living next to a construction site for the past six months.

“Might as well get over it,” I advised, snapping the gate closed. “Because it’s not going to change any time soon.”

I walked across the driveway and back inside the barn for the next two horses, thinking again that it was time to get over myself, get a new farm, and get out of here, forever.

Read more at Patreon with a subscription, or pre-order your copy of Horses in Wonderland at Amazon

Horses in Wonderland Now on Sale

If you’re looking for something new for your Kindle, pre-order Horses in Wonderland and it will download automatically on December 26th, 2018. That’s perfect if you’re looking for a good excuse to hide out from family after the holiday… just let them know you have some very important reading to do!

Just to catch you up, Horses in Wonderland is the sequel to Show Barn Blues, and yes, I can totally use “long-awaited” to describe it. After all, Show Barn Blues came out in 2015. That’s three years ago. And I’ve been getting requests for more about Grace and Kennedy and all of Seabreeze Equestrian Center ever since.

Horses in Wonderland Facebook Cover.png

With this book, I decided to have some fun with the surroundings. Seabreeze is located just outside of the tourist mecca of Walt Disney World Resort, which makes for a very strange equine experience. I based the barn itself and a lot of its unique problems on my time as a manager at Grand Cypress Equestrian Center, an old central Florida institution which closed its doors about ten years ago (making me officially old). I also took inspiration from some of my favorite places around Walt Disney World, including Disney’s Fort Wilderness Resort & Campground, Disney’s Boardwalk Inn, and, of course, the Magic Kingdom.

Horses in Wonderland Kindle Cover.jpgThe result, I think, is a lot of fun.

If you’re dying to take a look at Horses in Wonderland right now, every blessed page of it is available to subscribers at Patreon! At the $5 a month subscription level, you can read the entire first/second draft, plus you’ll receive a copy of the finished Kindle book in your email on publication day. (And you’ll get to read whatever I start writing next, as I write it.)

If you’re ready to pre-order the Kindle, hop over to Amazon and get that bad boy set to download on Dec. 26.

And if you’re waiting on a glorious paperback to hug and love and admire on your bookshelf, please stay tuned for the release date! (Viva physical media!)

Thank you for your support and the encouragement to continue Grace’s story!

Get HORSES IN WONDERLAND here.

Join me at Patreon here.

 

New Stories & First Chapter of Show Barn Blues Sequel

If you’re looking for new stories to read since you finished Luck (I know how quickly you people read!) then zip over to my Patreon page. I’ve posted several unpublished pieces, including a short story told by a racehorse, a deleted scene from Luckand the first chapter of my upcoming sequel to Show Barn Blues

Just join my Patreon with a $1 or $5 monthly subscription to start reading! The $1 subscription includes at least one unpublished work or deleted scene per month… I have so many pieces lined up to share!

Horse Photo by Erin Dolson on Unsplash

Photo by Erin Dolson on Unsplash

The $5 subscription lets you read along as I write Horses in Wonderland. This is the sequel to Show Barn Blues so many readers have been asking me for. Picking up with Grace during the spring directly after Luck, this book is going to explore one of my favorite topics: theme parks. If you’ve read Show Barn Blues, you know it’s set in a touristy area of Orlando, right near Walt Disney World Resort. So you can see how theme park horses might get mixed up with Grace’s show barn… especially when ex-dinner show princess Kennedy is involved!

Along with the monthly update to Horses in WonderlandI’m thinking of sharing some fun surprises, like screen-sharing while I actually write a chapter, so you can see the mess — I mean novel — as it’s being born.

And I’m also planning on sharing some chapters of another work in progress, a novel about theme park life tentatively titled You Must Be This Tall. Learn more about this original new story here and let me know if you want to read it!

My Patreon page isn’t just a place for you to read things I’ve written, by the way. It’s also where we can talk, share ideas, and talk about the horse business, books, music, life… anything! And, of course, you can tell me what you want me to write next, give me feedback on new writing, and generally boss me around. Everyone wins!

Visit Patreon.com/nataliekreinert, and please let me know if you have any questions!

And I just want to say a massive “thanks” to everyone who has read Luck and let me know, either by message or by Amazon review, how much they enjoyed it. I’m so excited to continue telling the story of Jules and Pete! As long as you want more of them, there will be more of them. So keep sharing, keep writing reviews, and please, keep sending your messages! You’re why I write their stories.